clean eating

Country Heat Meal Prep for the 1,200–1,500 Calorie Level

3-Day_Refresh_is_Easy_with_this_Super_Simple_No-Cook_Meal_Prep.jpg

Y’all, it’s time to turn up the heat on the dance floor… and in the kitchen with this Country Heat meal prep! This comfort food-inspired meal prep is sure to satisfy your craving for down-home cooking. Love warm and spicy? We can’t get enough of the Sweet Potato Veggie Hash. Crazy for creamy? The Avocado Chicken Salad is simply divine!

This meal prep menu uses Portion Fix color-coded portion-control containers to measure the amount of food you get to eat, so you never have to count calories. Green is for veggies, purple is fruits, red is protein, yellow is carbs, blue is healthy fats, orange is for seeds and dressings, and oils and nut butters are measured in teaspoons. Stock up on Mason jars or your favorite air-tight storage containers to store your meals.

This menu follows the Country Heat at the 1,200-1,500 calorie level and can be used by anyone following the Portion Fix eating plan. (Scroll to the bottom of the post to find out how to adjust this menu for the 1,500–1,800 calorie level). At this calorie level, each day you get:

  • 3 green containers
  • 2 purple containers
  • 4 red containers
  • 2 yellow containers
  • 1 blue containers
  • 1 orange containers
  • 2 teaspoons containers

We combined all of those containers into three satisfying meals and two snacks each day for you, so all you need to do is shop, prep, and enjoy your food. Take the comprehensive grocery list below to the store, and then use our step-by-step instructions to get busy in the kitchen on meal prep day!

 

 

These are the Healthy Meals You’ll Eat this Week:

Country-Heat-Meal-Prep-1200-1500-Calories-Full-Prep.jpg

Breakfast (M/W/F): Veggie Egg Muffins on Whole Grain English Muffin with Orange Slices

Breakfast (T/Th): Sweet Potato Veggie Hash with Turkey Sausage with Red Grapes

Shakeology Snack (DAILY): Vanilla Chia Shakeology Smoothie

PM Snack (DAILY): Apple with Peanut Butter

Lunch (M/W/F): Cilantro Lime Shredded Chicken with Black Eyed Pea Salad

Lunch (T/Th): Avocado Chicken Salad on Toasted Whole Grain Bread

Dinner (M/W/F): Roasted Pepper Tuna Melt

Dinner (T/Th): Roasted Chicken over Wilted Spinach Salad

 

MEAL PREP BREAKFASTS

Country-Heat-Meal-Prep-1200-1500-Calories-Breakfasts.jpg

 

M/W/F: Veggie Egg Muffins Served with ½ Whole Grain English Muffin

(2 eggs, ¼ cup spinach, ¼ cup sliced mushrooms, 2 tsp. green onion, 1 tsp. Italian seasoning, ¼ tsp. onion powder, ½ whole grain English muffin, 1 medium orange = ½ green, 1 purple, 1 red, 1 yellow)

T/Th: Sweet Potato Veggie Hash with Turkey Sausage and Red Grapes

(½ cup sweet potato, ½ tsp. olive oil, ½ tsp. chili powder, ¼ cup onion, ¼ cup red bell pepper, ½ cup spinach, 4 oz. lean ground turkey sausage, 1 cup grapes = 1 green, 1 purple, 1 red, 1 yellow, ½ tsp.)

 

MEAL PREP SNACKS

Country-Heat-Meal-Prep-1200-1500-Calories-Snacks.jpg

DAILY SHAKEOLOGY SNACK: Vanilla Chia Shakeology Smoothie

(1 scoop Vanilla Shakeology mixed with water, 4 tsp. chia seeds = 1 red, 1 orange)

DAILY AFTERNOON SNACK: Apple with Peanut Butter

(1 medium apple, 1 tsp. peanut butter = 1 purple, 1 tsp.)

 

MEAL PREP LUNCHES

Country-Heat-Meal-Prep-1200-1500-Calories-Lunches.jpg

 

M/W/F: Cilantro Lime Shredded Chicken with Black Eyed Pea Salad

(½ cup black eyed peas, ½ cup broccoli, ¼ cup red bell pepper, ¼ cup red onion, ¼ tsp. garlic, ¼ tsp. dijon mustard, 1 tsp. olive oil, ½ lemon juiced, 4 oz. chicken breast, 1 Tbsp. cilantro, ½ lime juiced = 1 green, 1 red, 1 yellow, 1 tsp.)

T/Th: Avocado Chicken Salad served on Toasted Whole Grain Bread

(¼ medium avocado, 4 oz. chicken breast, 1 slice whole grain toast, 2 Tbsp. celery, 2 Tbsp. red onion, ¼ lime juiced, ¼ cup sliced tomato, ½ cup spinach = 1 green, 1 red, 1 yellow, 1 blue)

 

MEAL PREP DINNERS

Country-Heat-Meal-Prep-1200-1500-Calories-Dinners.jpg

 

M/W/F: Roasted Pepper Tuna Melt

(4 oz. tuna, 1 bell pepper, ¼ cup sautéed kale, ¼ cup white onion, ½ tsp. Italian seasoning, ¼ cup cheddar cheese = 1½ green, 1 red, 1 blue)

T/Th: Roasted Chicken over Wilted Spinach Salad

(4 oz. rotisserie chicken, 1 cup wilted spinach, ½ tsp. olive oil, 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar = 1 green, 1 red, ½ tsp.)

 

Here is what all of your meals will look like on M/W/F:

Country-Heat-Meal-Prep-1200-1500-Calories-Full-Day-MWF.jpg

 

 

Here is what all of your meals will look like on T/Th:

Country-Heat-Meal-Prep-1200-1500-Calories-Full-Day-TTh.jpg

 

 

Follow this step-by-step guide to assemble your meal prep:

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Begin by preparing the chicken breast for baking; trim the raw chicken breast of any excess fat. Spread raw chicken breasts out in a large baking dish and add water to cover the bottom of the dish; season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cover with aluminum foil and place in a preheated oven for 35-40 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink and pulls apart easily. (Pre-cooked chicken breasts or rotisserie chicken can be purchased to save prep time). Allow chicken to cool in baking dish, then place on cutting board; use two forks to shred chicken into bite-sized pieces and divide between two large bowls for later use (one bowl will contain 12 oz. shredded chicken, the other will contain 8 oz. shredded chicken).
  2. While the chicken breasts are baking, prep the vegetables for the week. One at a time, wash, cut, and set each vegetable aside in separate bowls or piles. Remove the skin from the 2 onions (1 red and 1 white) and dice into small pieces; store in separate bowls. Brush off any dirt from the mushrooms (8 oz. container) and cut into thin slices. Rinse spinach leaves and allow to air dry. Rinse bunch of kale, allow to air dry, and shred ¾ cup. Rinse 4 bell peppers. Remove seeds from the red bell pepper and chop.  Cut the remaining 3 peppers (in color of choice) in half lengthwise and remove the seeds. Rinse and chop 1½ cups broccoli. Rinse and cut sweet potato into bite-sized pieces (peel first if desired). Rinse and thinly slice ½ cup tomato. Rinse and finely chop 4 Tbsp. celery. Rinse and finely chop ¼ cup green onion. Rinse and loosely chop 3 Tbsp. cilantro. Peel and finely chop 1 clove of garlic. Store any unused portion of vegetables for future use.
  3. Prep the Veggie Egg Muffins. Prepare a six-cup muffin tray by coating cups with nonstick spray. Note: If using a 12-cup muffin tray, coat the inner 6 cups with nonstick spray and fill the outer 6 cups with water to help evenly distribute heat. Heat a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add ¾ cup sliced mushrooms to the skillet, cooking just until softened (about 5 minutes). Next add ¾ cup spinach to the skillet, cooking until wilted (about 2-3 minutes). Remove vegetables from heat and divide between the 6 coated muffin cups. Crack 6 eggs into a large bowl; add 3 tsp. Italian seasoning, ¾ tsp. onion powder, salt and pepper to taste, and whisk to combine. Ladle the egg mixture into the muffin cups and top each muffin with 2 tsp. green onion. Place on a baking sheet (to prevent spills) in preheated 375°F oven for 12-15 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center of a muffin comes out clean. Allow to cool, then divide muffins among three containers (two muffins in each container) to refrigerate. Serve with ½ whole grain English muffin and 1 medium orange.
  4. Next, make the Roasted Pepper Tuna Melts. When the Veggie Egg Muffins are done, increase the temperature of the oven to 400°F. Add ¾ cup diced white onion to a skillet coated with nonstick cooking spray; cook over medium-high heat, stirring frequently, until onion is translucent (about 5 minutes). Add ¾ cup shredded kale to the skillet and cook until just wilted (about 2-3 minutes). Remove skillet from heat and set aside. Open and drain 3 cans of tuna. In a large bowl, combine 12 oz. drained tuna, sautéed vegetables, and 1½ tsp. Italian seasoning. Divide tuna mixture between 6 bell pepper halves and arrange in baking dish with tuna facing up. Bake for 20 minutes or until peppers have softened to desired texture. Divide ¾ cup shredded cheddar cheese among the bell pepper halves and return to oven for an additional 5 minutes or until cheese has melted. Note: Peppers will soften further when reheated; if you prefer a crispier texture, remove from oven earlier. When cool, divide pepper halves between three storage containers.
  5. Prep the Sweet Potato Veggie Hash. Place 1 cup diced sweet potato in a microwave-safe bowl and add a splash of water; microwave on high for 5 minutes (or steam sweet potatoes in a steamer on the stovetop until soft). While sweet potato cooks, heat 1 tsp. olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Remove sweet potato from microwave and toss with 1 tsp. chili powder; transfer to preheated skillet and continue to cook for an additional 10 minutes or until softened, stirring often. Remove from heat and set aside. Meanwhile, heat a separate skillet over medium-high heat; coat pan with nonstick cooking spray and add ½ cup chopped white onion and ½ cup diced red bell pepper, cooking until onion is translucent and peppers have softened. Add 8 oz. lean ground turkey sausage to skillet, cooking until meat is browned and no pink remains. Add 1 cup rinsed spinach to skillet, cooking until just wilted (about 2-3 minutes). Remove from heat and set aside to cool. Divide sweet potato and sausage mixture between 2 storage containers and refrigerate. Serve with 1 cup washed grapes.
  6. Make the Cilantro Lime Chicken. To the bowl containing the 12 oz. shredded chicken that was set aside earlier, add the juice from 1½ limes and 3 Tbsp. chopped cilantro. Toss until well combined and divide between three storage containers. Next make the Black Eyed Pea Salad. In a small bowl, make the dressing. Whisk together ¾ tsp. minced garlic, ¾ tsp. dijon mustard, 3 tsp. olive oil, and the juice from 1½ lemons; set aside. Open, drain, and rinse can of black eyed peas. In a large bowl, combine 1½ cups black eyed peas, 1½ cups chopped broccoli, ¾ cup chopped red bell pepper, and ¾ cup chopped red onion. Drizzle salad with dressing and toss until well coated; season with salt and pepper, if desired. To the three containers with the Cilantro Lime Chicken, evenly divide the Black Eyed Pea Salad and refrigerate.
  7. Prep the Avocado Chicken Salad. To the bowl containing 8 oz. shredded chicken that was set aside earlier, add 4 Tbsp. diced celery, 4 Tbsp. diced red onion, and juice from ½ lime; season with salt and pepper, if desired. Mix until well combined and divide between two storage containers. Place 1 cup spinach, ¼ cup tomato slices, and one slice whole grain bread or toast in each container. When ready to eat, add ¼ chopped avocado to the chicken mixture and layer chicken and vegetables on toast to make an open-faced sandwich
  8. Make the Wilted Spinach Salad. In a large skillet, heat 1 tsp. olive oil over medium-low heat. Add 2 cups spinach, cooking until just wilted (about 2-3 minutes). Remove from heat and divide spinach between two storage containers. Next, remove skin and breast meat from the rotisserie chicken. Add 4 oz. of chicken to each of the containers with spinach and place extra meat in a freezer-safe bag to use in a future week (or to make soup!). When ready to eat, drizzle Wilted Spinach Salad with 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar.
  9. Snacks do not need to be prepped in advance. Make the Vanilla Chia Shakeology Smoothie each morning by blending 1 scoop Vanilla Shakeology with 4 tsp. chia seeds, water, and ice. Serve one medium apple with 1 tsp. nut butter each afternoon.

 

Use this Grocery List to Make Your Country Heat Meal Prep:

Fruit
5 medium apples
2 cups grapes
3 medium oranges
2 limes
2 lemons

Vegetables
1 large sweet potato
8 oz. baby spinach leaves (4¾ cups)
8 oz. package mushrooms
1 medium red bell pepper
3 medium bell peppers (in color of choice)
1 bunch kale
1 bunch green onion
1 medium white onion
1 medium red onion
1 medium tomato
1 stalk celery
1 medium avocado
1 bunch cilantro
1 head broccoli (or 1½ cups chopped)
1 head garlic

Protein and Dairy
½ dozen eggs
1 rotisserie chicken (or 8 oz. cooked chicken breast)
1¼ lb. raw, boneless, skinless chicken breasts (or use remaining rotisserie chicken)
8 oz. lean turkey sausage
8 oz. shredded cheddar cheese
5 scoops Vanilla Shakeology

Dry and Canned Goods
1 loaf whole grain bread
1 package whole grain English muffins
1 (15 oz.) can black eyed peas
3 (5 oz.) cans light tuna packed in water

Pantry
Italian seasoning
olive oil
balsamic vinegar
salt
pepper
Dijon mustard
peanut butter
chia seeds
chili powder
onion powder
 

Here are some suggestions to increase this menu to fit the Portion Fix 1,500-1,800 calorie level of 4 green containers, 3 purple containers, 4 red containers, 3 yellow containers, 1 blue container, 1 orange container, and 4 tsp. per day:

On M/W/F:
Add 1 cup cauliflower roasted in 1 tsp. olive oil to dinner (1 green, 1 tsp.)
Add ½ English muffin to breakfast (1 yellow)
Add 1 tsp. additional peanut butter to the afternoon snack (1 tsp.)
Add 1 cup mixture of mango and blueberries to dinner (1 purple)

On T/Th:
Add ½ cup extra veggies to breakfast (½ green)
Add 1 tsp. additional peanut butter to the afternoon snack (1 tsp.)
Add½ cup sweet potatoes roasted in 1 tsp. olive oil to dinner (1 yellow, 1 tsp.)
Add 1 cup of strawberries to dinner salad (1 purple)
Add ½ cup extra spinach or other veggies to dinner (½ green)

8 Week Transition Diet

Transition diets are one of the easiest ways to become a healthier eater.

I’ve been doing them since the ’80s and, in fact, one of the first articles I ever wrote for Beachbody, in January 2001, was a 6-week transition plan. They’re not only great for first-time dieters but are also great for any time you feel like cleaning out your system after a period of slacking off. That’s why I do a variation of this plan almost every year. Here’s my latest creation.

It’s often said that no one diet works for every individual. While this is true, you may have noticed that all Beachbody eating plans target a similar goal: Eat more natural, whole foods and less junk. That’s because there are no secrets to healthy eating. There are strategies that can lead to various performance benefits, but 99% of the goal of eating healthy is to minimize junk and get your diet to consist of real food (you know, the stuff nature makes). With this in mind, our Beachbody nutrition guides use various strategies, all designed to lead you to the same place.

While those nutrition guides tend to be detailed, the 8-Week Transition Diet is for those of you who want simple. Outside of a small list of what you can’t eat, you’re free to chow down on anything. How hard can that be? You should also find that by making your transition gradually, the road to healthy eating is pretty easy.

 

Week 1

No junk. Eliminate junk food from your diet. That’s it, just junk. Other than this, you can eat whatever and whenever you like. The definition of junk is obvious stuff, like potato chips, candy, ice cream, cake, etc. You may be stricter if you’d like, but for Week 1, don’t be too hard on yourself. Just stay out of 7-Eleven. For many of you, this step alone will reap huge benefits.

Cheat Days: 2. Since no one’s perfect, you get two days to cheat. That’s right, two days where you can eat anything you want! A trick on cheat days is to listen to your body. At first, it’ll probably tell you it wants whatever you’ve been denying it. However, over time, it’ll start to crave nutrients you’re deficient in. Learn to read your body’s subtle signs. If you’re craving ice cream, you may be short on essential fatty acids. If you crave a hamburger, your diet may lack protein. By listening to your body and learning what it really needs in this way, you can make better food substitutions. It’s a way of getting in tune with yourself that will benefit you for your entire lifetime.

Weekly focus: Water. Not swimming in it, though that’s good too, but staying hydrated with it. “They” say you should drink at least 6 to 8 glasses of water per day, but I say you should drink more. Shoot for a gallon (though don’t worry if you fall short). Yeah, that probably seems crazy but almost all of us walk around dehydrated for most of our lives, which not only hurts the way we function but also makes us hungry when we’re actually thirsty. A glass of water when you feel hunger pangs both staves them off and helps you fill up faster when you do eat. As for other drinks, juices and sugary sodas also (obviously) fall into the junk category. And alcohol should be kept to a minimum. We tend to forget (purposely or not) that alcohol has calories. A lot of them: 7 calories per gram. Mixers can be even worse — not only can they add calories, but these sugary calories influence the way alcohol reacts with your body.
 

Week 2

Each week’s rules are cumulative, so the “no junk” rule from Week 1 will apply until the end, as will each subsequent week’s rule. Remember that this is a process. Treat it as though you’re in school and the subject is your own body.

Eat small, eat often. Eat every couple of hours while you’re awake and try not to eat anything for about three hours before you go to sleep. Following these rules will keep your blood sugar levels more static and your energy level will stay consistent. Try to keep each snack or meal balanced. Something like a 30% protein, 40% carbohydrate, and 30% fat ratio, though you don’t need to worry too much about it. Just realize that you need a bit from each macronutrient group. Eat based on what you’ll be doing for the next few hours (if you’re working out, eat a little more; sitting at a desk, eat a little less). The three-hours-before-bed rule is important, especially for fats and carbohydrates. By allowing time for all the carbs you eat to get into your bloodstream, your body will sleep in fat-burning mode, rather than in calorie-storing mode. This is important because undigested carbs in your stomach at night are stored as adipose tissue (fat).

Cheat Days: 2

Weekly focus: Carbs are not the enemy. Your body needs them, just like it needs proteins and fats. The trick is to choose the right carbs. As a society, we eat too much refined sugar. Complex carbs, like whole-grain breads, whole-grain rice, sweet potatoes, and legumes are outstanding foods. Even fruits, which have simple carbohydrates wrapped in fiber, are exceptionally healthy. While you don’t want a diet based on nothing but carbs, making the right carb choices will maximize your body’s potential. Try to avoid white rice and flours. Read labels, and try to avoid ones that use the word “enriched,” because this means these products have been stripped of their natural nutrients, overprocessed, and then fortified with a few random nutrients.

 

Week 3

Eat some colorful, low-density food at every meal. These are foods that take up a lot of space without a lot of calories. Veggies are the most obvious example. You can eat a salad bowl overflowing with lettuce and veggies and you most likely won’t exceed 100 calories. By eating low-density foods like veggies and fruits, you’ll keep your portions under control naturally, because they have very few calories for their size. Conversely, high-density foods, like chocolate and butter, are loaded with calories in even the smallest amounts. So beware of salad dressings and other things you add to salads and veggies. Only add enough for flavor; don’t fill up on them. When it comes to live foods, the richer the colors, the fresher the products tend to be. Try to eat a variety of colors in your diet. This simple-yet-random-feeling act will help ensure that you’re covering all your nutrient bases.

Cheat Days: 1

Weekly focus: Protein at every meal. This becomes even more important as you eat more low-density food, because protein tends to be high-density. Many veggies have a lot of protein, but the quantity you must consume starts to become prohibitive. Try to get some protein — meat, dairy, legumes, nuts, or seeds each time you eat, especially when you’re working out hard, because you need to repair broken-down muscle tissue. Since your body can only utilize a certain amount of protein at once, do your best to eat small amounts often (starting to see a theme?). Reading labels is a simple way to learn how to estimate your protein intake. You’ll notice natural foods don’t have labels but once your diet is comprised mostly of these you’ll no longer need them. More on this later.

 

Week 4

Cook at home. One of the best ways to control your eating is to prepare all your meals yourself. Eliminate all fast food (which hopefully happened in Week 1) and most other restaurant food. You may still eat food from certain restaurants where you can be sure of the ingredients (most will be savvy enough to make a point of how healthy their food is). As you may have seen in the news, restaurants tend to use alarming quantities of salt, among other things. This single step will often bring your body closer to homeostasis (its desired state of balance). This can be hard for many of us because we now have to plan our meals and prepare ahead of time, but try to treat it like vocational school — you don’t learn a new “job” without a little retraining.

Cheat Days: 1

Weekly focus: Fat is essential. Remember that fat is a vital part of your diet, not just something that makes you fat. What is not vital is junk fat in processed foods. Healthy fats come from fish, nuts, seeds, avocados, olives, etc. — natural sources. You need to be careful about the amount of fat you eat because it’s very dense. At 9 calories per gram, it contains more than double the calories of carbs and protein.

 

Week 5

Reduce starchy carbohydrates. Starches include rice, bread, potatoes, corn, beans, and other legumes. While many of these are in no way bad foods, most of us eat too much of them. The goal here is to cut way down on them, if not totally out, and then add them back in when your body feels like it needs energy. This will teach you the relationship you have with carbs. They are vital for energy but eating too many of them leaves us lethargic (and eventually fat). Once you figure this out, your entire relationship with food will change.

Cheat Days: 1

Weekly focus: Sugar is only beneficial after a hard workout or during a long one. Your body doesn’t need processed sugar. But if you really enjoy it and can’t avoid letting some sneak into your daily diet, the one-hour period after you exercise is the best time to indulge. During this window, your blood sugar is low, because you’ve used it up to finish your workout (assuming you pushed yourself), and eating sugar during this time will help you recover faster because it speeds into your system and initiates the recovery process. Adding a little protein, but not too much, will enhance your recovery even further.

 

Week 6

If man makes it, don’t eat it. This is likely to be the hardest week of your diet. You want to eat only whole foods and eliminate all processed foods, even good ones, for the week. This includes breads, most salad dressings, all cereal, luncheon meats, cheese, dried fruits, anything with preservatives, and alcoholic beverages. What you can eat are whole foods such as fruit, raw or steamed vegetables, meat (sans any type of sauce), natural whole-grain rice, poached eggs, etc. Since your eating habits have been slowly changing, this shouldn’t be that big a shock to your system, but it will still likely be hard. Try and get creative. There are now many raw and whole food “cook” books that can help keep you entertained.

Cheat Days: 1. The “cheat day” mentality is a good one. Decadent desserts, a night at the buffet, drinking with friends, etc., can be good for you as long as they are rewards and not habits. Studies proving this have been steadily appearing for about as long as we’ve been studying things. All work and no play does, indeed, make Jack a dull boy.

Weekly focus: Nuts and seeds make great snacks. A handful of raw almonds or cashews is a quick and easy snack that goes a long way. Don’t be put off by the high fat count of nuts, because this means it takes fewer of them to satiate you. Nuts and seeds are loaded with important phytonutrients, as well as good fats, proteins, and fiber.
 

Week 7

Be yourself. No rules — just try and eat as healthily as you can and do it by feel. Trusting yourself might seem like a lot of responsibility, but by now you’ll be up to it. Learning to eat by feeling what your body needs is an important step in your transformation. Consider the way you’ve been eating over the last six weeks, but don’t worry about what you should and shouldn’t do. Just fuel yourself. The point is to take a mental break. Relax and allow yourself to eat in a way that feels normal. You may be surprised to find yourself craving something healthy instead of a candy bar or soda. You’ll be better at listening to your body because it’ll tell you what it needs to eat, as opposed to what you’re used to eating. Your body should feel somewhat transformed.

“Reward for a Life Well Lived” Days: 1

Weekly focus: If you’re so hungry at night that you can’t sleep, try a protein shake. A recent study confirmed what’s been a focus of this diet for two decades; that protein before bed can raise amino acid activity for a full night of rest.

 

Week 8

Eat a perfect diet. Let’s get after it. No one is better able to tell you what you should eat than you. Our bodies are all different, and the key to your own perfect diet is learning about how your body reacts to different foods under different circumstances. Your journey over the last seven weeks should have brought you to a new understanding of how food affects your body, both for good and for bad. The time has come to test it. See how well you can eat for a week. In fact, see how well you can eat for the rest of your life. Live and enjoy.

Reward Days: 1, of course!

Weekly Focus: Don’t bonk. Bonking is a state when your body runs out of blood sugar and glycogen for energy. If you feel like your workouts are going backward instead of forward, this is a likely culprit. Use your energy level as your gauge. As soon as it starts to drop, start adding carbs back into your diet until you feel energized all day long. When you feel energized during your workouts and the rest of the day, you’ll know you’ve found the right balance between carbs and other nutrients. Also, remember that as your body puts on more muscle, you will need to eat more. Muscle weighs much more than fat, so as you gain muscle and lose fat, your body shrinks without losing weight. You will also require more calories in order to maintain your muscle. So, when you’re working out hard, don’t be afraid to eat more carbs than you do otherwise.

Author: Beachbody

Shakeology No Bake Cookies

Shakeology No-Bake Cookies

1 cup Chocolate Shakeology powder
1 cup natural peanut butter
1 cup oatmeal (quick)
1/3 to 1/2 cup honey or agave nectar (to taste)

Directions: Combine ingredients in bowl. Mix well. Roll into balls (about 1 heaping teaspoon each).

Optional: Roll balls in crushed nuts, oatmeal mixed with a little cinnamon, graham cracker crumbs, or unsweetened coconut flakes.

Calories: 166 per serving